Duologue: Aaron Martin talks about ‘A Room Now Empty’

Along the pathways of my stationary travels, I have not encountered an artist more mesmerizing or compelling than Aaron Martin.  Centered around his singular cello, he employs a plethora of other instruments (guitar, banjo, ukulele, lap steel, concertina, singing bowls) to forge a unique sound and style with roots sunk deep in rustic earthiness yet somehow reaching boundlessly into transcendent and ethereal realms. It is as if Martin unlocks not only the resonance of  his instruments, but extracts the very history and memory out of the elements from which they are made. I find his music to be ancient, timeless, and modern all at once, always moving and unfailingly pointed towards true north.

Never has this been more true than on his newest work entitled A Room Now Empty soon to be released by UK-based contemporary classical label Preserved Sound, Martin’s first full-length solo record since the sublime Comet’s Coma (Eilean Rec., 2014).  Soon listeners will be able to revel in its stark, intimate beauty and be shaken by its soul-deep, melancholic yearning. In the meantime, Stationary Travels is very pleased to present this interview provided courtesy of Preserved Sound & Hayden Berry in which Aaron talks about how the layered meanings in the music and titles of  the album and how they don’t allow one clear-cut reading of the music.

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2017 In Review: A Sense of Place and Time

Each of these albums is conceptually, thematically or musically connected to a particular place or time – personal narratives, journeys remembered, or depictions of landscape real or imagined. Each one takes the listener on a journey and immerses them in a unique place or moment in time. One might say they represent the very essence of stationary traveling, which makes them quite to special to this listener in particular… 

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PREMIERE: “Leidseplein” by Klangriket & Sjors Mans [piano and coffee records]

Discovering new artists via streaming platforms is not only the province of curators and listeners. It is also a way that artists can discover one another and, occasionally, these discoveries can open the doors to collaborations that would never have otherwise happened. Such is the case with Fabian Rosenberg (aka Klangriket) and Sjors Mans. After encountering each other’s work on Soundcloud and conversing over the wire about music & sound gear, they developed a piece entitled “Sarem” (listen here). It was a good enough experience that the two musicians felt they wanted to co-locate and see what they would come up with if they shared the same room while writing. So, Fabian left his hometown of Stockholm to visit Sjors at his Amsterdam studio. 

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Sound Impression: Quiet Ecology by Panoptique Electrical [Sound in Silence]

Jason Sweeney is known for a wide variety of projects and many musical aliases over the past two decades. Perhaps the most personal and intimate is the classically oriented Panoptique Electrical which saw a new release this month, the first since last year’s Disappearing Music for Face. A great deal of what you need to know about the know record is encapsulated in its title – Quiet Ecology.

In 2016 Sweeney undertook a quiet odyssey across four Australian cities (Adelaide, Perth, Sydney and Melbourne), searching out and mapping quiet spaces in and amongst these built environments. He wanted to discover as many zones of quiet or retreat in these cities and make compositions in response to these locations. He created maps and listening walks that took him from space to space. His desire was to ask a simple question: Can you find a way to release yourself, if only temporarily, from the noise of the world? ‘Quiet Ecology’ is a sonic memorial to these spaces and a musical act of quiet preservation. – Sound in Silence 

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Premiere: New Beginnings by Alina K

It was the piano that first captured composer Alina K’s imagination as a child in Lithuania. Having moved to London with the intention of further developing her piano
playing skills and performed at the opening ceremonies of the prestigious Vancouver Fashion Week, she recently took the bold decision to leave a steady work in the world of luxury retail to focus full-time on her music. This has led to her first collection of music to be formally released, an EP due in early February of 2018. Produced by Nick Tauber, who has worked on bestselling albums for Thin Lizzy, Def Leppard, and Marillion, Awakening will feature selections from fourteen original compositions that she recently recorded at the famous Abbey Road Studios. The first track from the album, the aptly titled “New Beginnings”, premieres today and allows listeners to experience the uplifting beauty and direct emotional appeal of her elegant compositional style.

“I want to create music that transcends boundaries. My compositions come from my heart and I am so happy to see them bringing joy and positivity to the audience.” – Alina K

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Hammock – Columbus (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) / Mysterium

Few artists in the world of instrumental music have a compass as locked on to true north as Hammock. For years, this Nashville-based project of Marc Byrd and Andrew Thompson has  served up a rich sonic feast spanning the genres of ambient, post-rock, and modern classical while resonating with heartfelt, and often heart-wrenching, emotion. Perhaps what they are capable of was summed up best and most succinctly in a comment to one of their recent videos where the listener said “Hammock has this way of telling you, ‘Everything will be okay.’, in the most beautiful way possible”. And in 2017 we have a double helping of new work from the band, an original motion picture soundtrack and a full-length studio album.

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Martyn Heyne – Electric Intervals [7K!]


Don’t be fooled by Martyn Heyne’s youthful appearance. The Hamburg-born composer & producer brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to his debut full-length album. He took up piano and guitar at an early age teaching himself the instruments in non-traditional ways before going on to be classically trained at the Conservatory of Amsterdam. In addition to being a live performer with the acclaimed indie band Efterklang and opening shows for Nils Frahm and A Winged Victory for the Sullen as a solo artist, Heyne has worked with a diverse group of high-profile artists in his Lichte studio in Berlin including Peter Broderick , alt-J, and The National (for a nice sampling of these check out his ‘Monday is Ok’ mix here). He brings all of this compositional and recording experience as well as his fondness for the electric guitar to the table for the recently released Electric Intervals, an album which he approached with a very specific philosophy.

“The number of parameters that determine a recording appears to be infinite. The mood, instrument, tuning, settings, microphones, room, placement, temperature, time of day, etc. all contribute to sound. The magic, once captured, is impossible to recreate. This might seem a hindrance, but it’s really the whole point of recording for me and also the reason why I never use samples or virtual instruments…the better the instrument sounds, the more you want to convey that quality.’’ – Martyn Heyne

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Video Premiere: Never Alone (Hámori Session) by vaghy

vaghy (Tamás Vághy) is a Hungarian composer and pianist who is making an appearance as a newcomer on the modern classical scene, but is no musical neophyte. Surrounded by his father’s old tapes and vinyl, his love of music came at an early age. Having developed into a multi-instrumentalist with a taste for a wide variety of genres, he performed in thousands of concerts from clubs to large festivals including serving a the keyboardist for the well-known Hungarian rock band Anna and the Barbies. During these years, in the quiet environs of his bedroom studio, he indulged a passion for classical music. After seeing a Nils Frahm video several years ago, Tamás was inspired to bring this more personal work into the public sphere, performing live sets in 2016 and again in 2017 in support of Frahm’s own worldwide Piano Day event.

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PREMIERE: “Repose” by Mike Lazarev [1631 Recordings]

A good friend and active supporter of instrumental music as the creative force behind the revered Headphone Commute (a huge influence on Stationary Travels, btw), Mike Lazarev has more recently revealed himself to us as a fine composer of solo piano music with a pair of mini-albums released on 1631 Recordings. Completed in New York before a move to London and intended to be listened to as the second half to last year’s Unhinged, the forthcoming follow-up entitled Dislodged offers ten exquisite pieces that explore “the outer reaches of spatial and reductionist pianism”.

If the two albums comprise a journey, it would seem (and we would hope) it is on a path to healing. Muted, wistful, and plaintive Dislodged may be, but the track titles hint at peace and recovery while sweet melodies and the occasional flourish of other instruments as well as a TV interlude add a sort of warmth to the proceedings. One might imagine the dark face of a building at night in the heart of the city where a single window glows with light and, as we peer inside and tune our ears to sounds coming from that direction, we get a glimpse of the composer having a dialog with his instrument. Intimate and personal perhaps, but expressed in a universal wordless language that anyone who has experienced detachment, isolation, or heartache will instantly understand.  Continue reading

VIDEO PREMIERE: “Winter’s Heart” by Andrew James Johnson (feat. Chamber Ensemble of London)

Classical composer and pianist Andrew James Johnson will release his debut solo album Winter’s Heart in November 2017, a record he developed over a number of years, taking inspiration from travels from the Californian coast and Hawaii, to the Canary Islands and mainland Europe. Born in Birmingham to a family of six siblings, Andrew was brought up on the music of The Beatles, Elton John and David Bowie while at the same time he developed an unprompted love of classical music immersing himself in the works of Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin – a juxtaposition in styles that shaped the musical landscape of his childhood and is reflected in his passionate compositional style which Johnson embraces with genuine conviction as he seeks to forge a genuine connection with his audience.

‘Winter’s Heart’ is my debut classical album. It’s the summation of my creative output as a pianist/composer over the last few years. The ‘winter’ theme represents what I personally tap into when I’m alone with nature – stillness, clarity, openness and purity. The piano has such a wonderful sound world to explore. It’s sonorities are limitless and can reach into our emotional core with just a few notes! I hope that my music will touch listeners and allow them to experience their own beautiful isolation and to be lost in the ebb and flow of the unraveling musical textures, much like winter itself…”

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Duologue: A Conversation with Jane Antonia Cornish

My guest for this edition of duologues is award-winning composer Jane Antonia Cornish who grew up in England and is currently based in New York City. In addition to composing scores for the acclaimed documentaries, Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood and Citizen Jane: Battle for the City as well as the drama Fireflies in the Garden, (starring Julia Roberts, Ryan Reynolds and Willem Dafoe), Cornish was the first female in history to win a British Academy Award (BAFTA) for music in 2005. In that same year the UK Film Council also honored her with a Breakthrough Brit in Hollywood award. Most recently she has released her third solo album Into Silence, an exquisite, intimate, and deeply affecting work that ICON Magazine called “A virtual blessing in a world gone mad”, a sentiment with which I would wholeheartedly agree.

Links:  Solo Albums | Order signed CDs  | Into Silence via Innova

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VIDEO PREMIERE: In the Hands of Strangers by Danny Mulhern

Reflections on a Dead Sea is the debut full-length album by British composer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist Danny Mulhern which presents an augmented, evolved and extended version of his purposefully muted original score for short film The Dead Sea, directed by Stuart Gatt. Set in Libya and backed by the humanitarian organization Medicins Sans Frontieres (aka Doctors Without Borders), the film tells the harrowing story of Emmanuel and Olu, a husband & wife who become incarcerated in a migrant detention center following a failed attempt to flee to Europe. The album was recorded in collaboration with the London Contemporary Orchestra and cellist Oliver Coates in a format that fuses composed and improvised elements together as Mulhern explains:

“We discovered the sound that fitted the film best was extremely soft articulations, played so they were barely audible. It opened up a fascinating sound world that I felt could go beyond the film…For the album sessions I had some pre-recorded piano improvisations, with instructions for each player to play over them within certain parameters (such as articulations, choosing notes from certain chords and never staying longer than a bar on any given note.) We could then home in on interesting sounds that were suggested with each take – a sort of controlled randomness. This way of working was an epiphany; it was really exciting to essentially hear new music coming out of the control room speakers for the first time.”

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